Do Trail Cameras Flash at Night? [What You Need to Know]

Do Trail Cameras Flash at Night?

Trail cameras have revolutionized wildlife monitoring, allowing us to capture stunning images and videos of animals in their natural habitats. These cameras have become increasingly popular among hunters, wildlife enthusiasts, and property owners alike. However, one aspect of these cameras that many users are unsure about is whether trail cameras flash at night. In this … Read more

Trail Camera PIR Motion Sensors: Everything You Need to Know

Trail Camera PIR Motion Sensors

Trail Camera PIR Motion Sensors

PIR sensors, also known as motion sensors, are used in trail cameras to detect movement in front of the camera. Every trail camera will have one or more PIR sensors. These sensors are integral to the design of every trail camera and will directly impact each camera’s performance.

In addition to the PIR sensors themselves, many trail cameras will also have adjustable settings for the sensor(s). This allows you to get optimal performance from the camera regardless of the environment you have the camera monitoring.

In this article, we will explain what a PIR sensor is and how they work. We will also explain what to look for from a PIR sensor when buying a trail camera as well as talk about the adjustable settings you might find for a trail camera’s motion sensor(s). Finally, we will talk about some tips to get the most out of your camera’s PIR sensors.

Read more

Best Batteries For Trail Cameras

Best Batteries For Trail Cameras

Best Batteries For Trail CamerasIt might seem like the toughest part about trail cameras is choosing the best camera to fit your needs. While that is probably true, choosing the best batteries to power your trail camera is another important decision if you want your trail camera to be able to perform at an optimal level.

Why The Battery You Choose For Your Trail Camera Is Important

Most trail cameras today will run on AA batteries. So when most people get their first trail camera the initial reaction is to buy whichever AA batteries are on sale, but the fact of the matter is that the batteries you choose to put in your trail camera will not only determine how long each set of batteries will last, but it can also impact how well your trail camera performs. Choosing the wrong battery can even determine if your trail camera will work at all in extreme weather conditions. In addition, certain types of batteries may not work in your trail camera at all.

Energizer AA Batteries, Max Double A Battery Alkaline, 20 Count
Our Favorite
Energizer AA Lithium Batteries, World's Longest Lasting Double A Battery, Ultimate Lithium (24 Battery Count)
Tenergy Premium Rechargeable AA Batteries, High Capacity 2500mAh NiMH AA Battery, AA Cell Battery, 12 Pack
Name
Energizer Max AA Alkaline Batteries
Energizer Ultimate Lithium AA Batteries
Tenergy Premium Rechargeable AA Batteries
Type of Battery
Alkaline
Lithium
NiMH Rechargeable
Initial Cost
$
$$
$$$
Long Term Cost
$$$
$$
$
Cold Weather Performance
Fair
Best
Good
How Long Do They Last
Fair
Best
Good
Energizer AA Batteries, Max Double A Battery Alkaline, 20 Count
Name
Energizer Max AA Alkaline Batteries
Type of Battery
Alkaline
Initial Cost
$
Long Term Cost
$$$
Cold Weather Performance
Fair
How Long Do They Last
Fair
Our Favorite
Energizer AA Lithium Batteries, World's Longest Lasting Double A Battery, Ultimate Lithium (24 Battery Count)
Name
Energizer Ultimate Lithium AA Batteries
Type of Battery
Lithium
Initial Cost
$$
Long Term Cost
$$
Cold Weather Performance
Best
How Long Do They Last
Best
Tenergy Premium Rechargeable AA Batteries, High Capacity 2500mAh NiMH AA Battery, AA Cell Battery, 12 Pack
Name
Tenergy Premium Rechargeable AA Batteries
Type of Battery
NiMH Rechargeable
Initial Cost
$$$
Long Term Cost
$
Cold Weather Performance
Good
How Long Do They Last
Good

What Are Some Things To Consider When You Are Trying To Buy The Best Trail Camera Batteries?

Read more

Do Cellular Trail Cameras Require a Subscription? (Uncovering the Truth)

Do Cellular Trail Cameras Require a Subscription?

Increasingly popular and widely used among hunters, property owners, researchers, and wildlife enthusiasts alike, cellular trail cameras offer a convenient way to capture footage in the wilderness or other remote areas without having to physically be present. But do cellular trail cameras require a subscription in order to function? This is a common question and … Read more

How Does a Trail Camera Work? – The Complete Guide

How Do Trail Cameras Work?

How Do Trail Cameras Work?

Trail cameras are a type of camera that is frequently used by hunters, wildlife enthusiasts, and property owners. These cameras are designed to be left unattended for long periods of time as they take photos or videos of the animals or people that moved in front of it.

But how do trail cameras work? In this article, we’ll answer that question and explore everything you need to know about these amazing devices.

What Is a Trail Camera Used For?

The most common use for trail cameras is to monitor game animals or other wildlife in an area. They are usually mounted on trees or posts in strategic locations, such as near a water source or along a game trail, in order to get the best possible pictures or videos of wildlife. Trail cameras are a valuable tool for hunters, as they can help to pattern the behavior of game animals.

The second most common use for trail cameras is for security and surveillance purposes on both personal and commercial properties. Some people who are using trail cameras for security and surveillance purposes might opt for a camera with cellular connectivity depending on how quickly they want to see the pictures and videos it has captured.

How Do Trail Cameras Work?

Read more

6 Tips to Prevent Trail Cameras From Having False Triggers

False Trigger

It is frustrating to check the SD card on your trail camera only to find out that the memory card is filled up with pictures and videos that have no subject in them. If you are asking, “Why does my trail camera take pictures of nothing?” your camera is the victim of false triggers.

Bushnell defines a trail camera as having a false trigger when the passive infrared sensor (PIR sensor) thinks that there is motion and heat in front of the camera lens and captures an image or video when in fact there is no subject in the image.

Having a trail camera taking pictures of nothing is bad enough, but to make matters worse, these false triggers drain your trail camera’s batteries. This can require you to be constantly purchasing new batteries for your camera regardless of how energy efficient it is.

Luckily, we have a list of the top 6 easy things you can do to help avoid false triggers with your trail camera.

Read more

Buying Guide for Best Rated Trail Cameras

Browning Strike Force HD Pro Trail Camera Review

Updated July 6, 2022 

SPYPOINT Link-MicroThese days people seem to be getting busier and busier. People are having difficulty finding time for leisure activities including hunting. Many hunters might only be able to head out into the woods for just a couple of days a year. So when they head off to their deer stand or blind they want to go to a location that will give them a good chance of seeing activity and being successful. Unless you are okay leaving your success to chance you want information to help you know where and when you should hunt. One of the best ways to get information about deer or other game in your area is to use a trail camera.

Trail cameras allow you to capture pictures or videos 24 hours a day along with important information about the time and conditions when each image or video clip was recorded. The problem is that there are a dizzying number of models to choose from with each having its own unique combination of features. So it can feel daunting to identify what features and specifications that are most important to you so you can get a trail camera that meets your needs regardless of your budget.

This guide is meant to help inform you about the most important features of trail cameras and what specifications you should be targeting whether you’re on a budget or price is no object.

1. Image Quality

Image quality is easily the most important feature to consider when buying a new trail camera. The most important thing to look at with regard to image quality is the number of megapixels, which is abbreviated as MP. Megapixels is how image resolution is measured – and the more megapixels, the better.

That may not be much of a surprise, but what is surprising is how crisp of an image even a lower megapixel camera (like 8-10 MP) can display. This may not mean much to those for whom price is no obstacle, but for everyone else it’s significant. As long as you have sufficient lighting, a megapixel count from 8-12 MP should be fine for most situations. More mid-range priced cameras range between 14-16 MP. If, however, you want to focus on nighttime photography or capturing images of fast-moving animals, the higher-priced cameras usually range between 16-20 MPs. There are even some luxury models that come with 30 MP resolution. Of course, the higher the resolution – the more you money will expect to spend.

Another thing buyers want to think about is the fact that higher resolution images will fill up the storage space on your memory card more quickly. This can be a problem for people who intend on leaving their trail camera for an extended period of time before checking it – especially if it is in an area with a lot of activity. Luckily, most trail cameras will allow you to choose if you want to capture images at the maximum resolution the camera is capable of or at a lower resolution to help you save on storage space. However, most people will be fine having their cameras on the maximum resolution setting if they have a large enough memory card.

Read more

How to Make Any Trail Camera Cellular

SPYPOINT CELL-LINK Universal Cellular Trail Camera Adapter

SPYPOINT CELL-LINK Universal Cellular Trail Camera Adapter

Whether you are using it for security purposes or trying to figure out the perfect location for your next hunt, have you ever put your trail camera out to monitor an area and wished that it was a cellular trail camera instead so you could see the pictures it captured right away and eliminate the need to go out to the camera and pull its memory card?

If you are like most of us your answer is probably yes. But how?

So let’s talk about how you can make make your trail camera have cellular trail camera capabilities, what your options are, how much it will cost, and when it makes sense to do it.

Read more

Best Cellular Trail Camera Reviews and Buying Guide

2G Cellular Trail Cameras

Updated December 7, 2020

Best Cellular Trail CameraFor people who use trail cameras the most important and anticipated moment is when you get to view the pictures that it has captured. Avid outdoorsmen know that getting the most accurate and up to date images and information about the game animals in your area can be the difference between success and failure in their outdoor activities. Property owners who use game cameras for surveillance and security purposes know that getting viewing images and videos in a timely fashion is very important if there is a theft or vandalism. That being said, depending on your situation, it may not always be easy or convenient to go out and retrieve the pictures from your game camera. In these cases, you might want to consider purchasing a trail camera model that utilizes cellular technology to send pictures and videos to you as soon as they are taken.

Cellular trail cameras can send you pictures and videos immediately after they are captured. They can allow you to know what is going on in the woods or on your property in real-time, without you needing to physically go check the trail cameras and if you are using them for hunting, without running the risk that you will be scaring the game animals out of your area and contaminating the area with human scent. Thankfully, there are a lot of terrific trail cameras to choose from these days and the prices have really come down from where they were just a few years ago.

In a Hurry? Here is a List of the Cellular Trail Cameras We Recommend:

Comparison of Cellular Trail Cameras

SPYPOINT LINK-DARK Cellular Trail Camera 42 LED Invisible Infrared Flash Game Camera with 80-foot Flash and 100-foot Detection Range LTE-Capable Cellular Trail Camera 12MP 0.07-second Trigger Speed
Covert Blackhawk LTE - Verizon Realtree
CuddeLink Dual Cell, Model# K-5789
Bushnell Impulse 20MP Cellular No Glow Trail Camera, Verizon
SPYPOINT Link Micro with 16GB MicroSD (Smallest on The Market!) Wireless/Cell Trail Camera, 4 Power LEDs, Fast 4G Photo Transmission w/Preactivated SIM, Fully Configurable via App (Link-Micro-V)
My Camera Name
SPYPOINT LINK-DARK & LINK-DARK-V
Covert Blackhawk LTE (VERIZON) & Covert Code Black LTE (AT&T)
Cuddeback CuddeLink Dual Cell Model # K-5789
Bushnell Impulse
SPYPOINT Link-Micro
Camera Resolution
12MP
20MP
20MP
20MP
10MP
Video Resolution
720p
1080p
720p
1080p
NA - Doesn't record video
Flash Type
No Glow
No Glow
Dual Flash that allows you to choose between No Glow and Low Glow flash options
No Glow
Low Glow
Flash Range
80 feet
100 feet
100 feet
100 feet
80 feet
Trigger Speed
0.07 second
0.65 second
0.25 second
0.2 second
0.5 second
Cellular Network
LINK-DARK (AT&T) & LINK-DARK-V (Verizon)
Covert Blackhawk LTE (VERIZON) & Covert Code Black LTE (AT&T)
Verizon & AT&T Models are available
AT&T & Verizon versions available
-
SPYPOINT LINK-DARK Cellular Trail Camera 42 LED Invisible Infrared Flash Game Camera with 80-foot Flash and 100-foot Detection Range LTE-Capable Cellular Trail Camera 12MP 0.07-second Trigger Speed
My Camera Name
SPYPOINT LINK-DARK & LINK-DARK-V
Camera Resolution
12MP
Video Resolution
720p
Flash Type
No Glow
Flash Range
80 feet
Trigger Speed
0.07 second
Cellular Network
LINK-DARK (AT&T) & LINK-DARK-V (Verizon)
Covert Blackhawk LTE - Verizon Realtree
My Camera Name
Covert Blackhawk LTE (VERIZON) & Covert Code Black LTE (AT&T)
Camera Resolution
20MP
Video Resolution
1080p
Flash Type
No Glow
Flash Range
100 feet
Trigger Speed
0.65 second
Cellular Network
Covert Blackhawk LTE (VERIZON) & Covert Code Black LTE (AT&T)
CuddeLink Dual Cell, Model# K-5789
My Camera Name
Cuddeback CuddeLink Dual Cell Model # K-5789
Camera Resolution
20MP
Video Resolution
720p
Flash Type
Dual Flash that allows you to choose between No Glow and Low Glow flash options
Flash Range
100 feet
Trigger Speed
0.25 second
Cellular Network
Verizon & AT&T Models are available
Bushnell Impulse 20MP Cellular No Glow Trail Camera, Verizon
My Camera Name
Bushnell Impulse
Camera Resolution
20MP
Video Resolution
1080p
Flash Type
No Glow
Flash Range
100 feet
Trigger Speed
0.2 second
Cellular Network
AT&T & Verizon versions available
SPYPOINT Link Micro with 16GB MicroSD (Smallest on The Market!) Wireless/Cell Trail Camera, 4 Power LEDs, Fast 4G Photo Transmission w/Preactivated SIM, Fully Configurable via App (Link-Micro-V)
My Camera Name
SPYPOINT Link-Micro
Camera Resolution
10MP
Video Resolution
NA - Doesn't record video
Flash Type
Low Glow
Flash Range
80 feet
Trigger Speed
0.5 second
Cellular Network
-

Is There a Difference Between Cellular and Wireless Trail Cameras?

Wireless Trail Cameras Defined

A wireless trail camera allows you to view the pictures or videos it captures without needing to connect cables to the camera or removing the memory card. Wireless game cameras send these files to your computer or smartphone in one of two ways.

One way that these files can be transferred wirelessly is through the use of Bluetooth technology. These Bluetooth enabled cameras will allow you to connect to the camera with your smartphone or computer via a Bluetooth connection and transfer the pictures and video that way. The one negative about these cameras is that you will still need to be relatively close to them (100 feet or less in most cases) to make the Bluetooth connection and download the files onto your device.

The other way these cameras can transfer information wirelessly is through the use of a Wi-Fi internet connection. Once connected to the internet these Wi-Fi enabled cameras can send you the pictures and videos it captures. One drawback to Wi-Fi enabled trail cameras is that they need to stay within the Wi-Fi range so it can make a connection. Another drawback for Wi-Fi enabled trail cameras is that they will drain your batteries faster if they are always connected to the internet (so you might want to consider a solar panel or battery box for these models).

Cellular Trail Cameras Defined

One way in which cellular trail cameras differ from wireless trail cameras is that they have a much greater range. Instead of needing to keep it within range of a Wi-Fi signal so it can connect to the internet or walking up to within 100 feet or less of the game camera to receive images and/or videos all you need to do with a cellular game camera is to put it in an area that has a strong enough cellular signal so it can make a connection (like your cellphone).

This freedom to post the camera in the areas you are most interested in monitoring means that you can get the information you want and thanks to cellular technology you can get that information when you want it.

Cellular Game Cams are Often Referred to as “Wireless”

Even though wireless technology doesn’t necessarily mean cellular technology most people who use the term wireless trail camera are actually referring to a trail cam that uses cellular technology to send photos and videos.

Note:  Because in the trail camera world the terms wireless and cellular are used interchangeably we want you to know that anytime we might use the phrases wireless trail camera or wireless game camera in the rest of this article we are referring to a cellular trail cam.

Cellular Trail Cameras Can Save You Money

On one hand, buying a cellular trail camera might cost you some extra money initially, but in the long run, having a cellular game camera might save you money. For example, the place I prefer to deer hunt is a 4-hour drive away and is accessible only with a truck. After a few trips each fall to check the images on my trail cameras I can spend a couple of hundred dollars in gas each year, which will go a long way to paying for any additional expenses I might have with a cellular deer camera.

Plus, the information I can obtain by having the images of deer and other wild game from my trail camera emailed to me during the season can help me make those critical in-season decisions of where to hunt.

What to Consider When Buying a Cellular Trail Camera

Like all trail cameras, you want to consider image quality, trigger speed, and flash range. You can read our complete buying guide for trail cameras here.

However, there are some additional things you should keep in mind when buying cellular game cameras. These things include:

Read more

Why Is My Trail Camera Not Taking Pictures?

Trail Camera Out of Order

What To Check If Your Trail Camera Is Not Taking Any Pictures?If you have ever gone to check your trail camera and found that it hasn’t been taking pictures or recording videos you know that it can be very frustrating. Is it broken? Do you need to adjust the settings? Is it something else altogether?

The good news is that these days trail cameras are pretty dependable and durable. So before you run out and buy a new camera there are a few things that you can do to troubleshoot and easily fix most problems.

Depending on the specific symptoms your trail camera is experiencing the main culprit(s) behind your problem can vary. So let’s break it down by the situation.

Tips On What To Check If Your Trail Camera Is Not Taking Any Pictures

Read more

Should You Buy a 2G Cellular Trail Camera?

2G Cellular Trail Cameras

If you are thinking about investing in a cellular trail camera there are probably a ton of features that you are looking at, or sorting through. Sometimes it can actually feel a little overwhelming. Some of these features might include image quality (how many megapixels the camera has), trigger speed, type of flash (no glow vs. low glow vs. incandescent), flash range, video resolution, and which cellular carrier you should use. If you are feeling overwhelmed by all of the options and choices you can read our Cellular Trail Camera Buying Guide and Reviews as well as our original Buying Guide for Best Rated Trail Cameras, which covers more than just cellular trail cameras.

Due to the fact cellular carriers don’t have identical coverage areas many people think about which carrier the camera is able to use so they can make sure there is coverage in the area they wish to place the camera. However, sometimes people forget to see if the camera uses a 2G or 3G network. 2G service is becoming a thing of the past. So if you buy a trail camera that utilizes 2G towers it will no longer be able to transmit pictures when the last of the 2G towers are taken out of service in your area, which has already happened in many places. When this happens a 2G trail camera will still capture images and video, but it will no longer be able to transmit images, which is very frustrating when you just spent a bunch of money to get a cellular trail camera. If you look online there are tons of reviews where people have purchased 2G trail cameras only to find out that they don’t work where they want to set them up. That is why we recommend buying 3G cellular trail cameras in our Cellular Trail Camera Buying Guide.

So is there ever a situation when it is OK to buy a 2G cellular trail camera? Surprisingly there is one situation when you might want to consider buying a 2G cellular trail camera.

Read more